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Clinical research has been around since the dawn of our species, in one form or another. Humans have always tested new remedies and worked to improve healthcare, even before we have a deep understanding of human health. Today, of course, the process is structured, controlled and very strict, in order to do no harm and to ensure that the new treatments actually work before they are sold to the general public.

Today, we have more tools than ever before to develop new treatments and care protocols. The data, for example, has allowed researchers to study trends and gain insights that help advance clinical research. Here’s what it looks like in practice.

The current state of clinical research

Luckily, we’ve gone beyond having someone eat a plant hoping it helps ease the pain. But what is the current state of clinical research? How do scientists test new drugs and treatments in the safest way possible?

For ethical clinical research, scientists are forced to conduct their research “in the real world” after taking important steps to ensure the safety of their interventions for volunteers. However, the real test comes through observational or clinical trials.

In a clinical trial, researchers follow four phases to test their intervention:

  1. Dose and minimize side effects
  2. Security assessment
  3. Comparison with old treatments
  4. Approval for large scale testing

Once a clinical trial has successfully passed these four phases, a treatment can be approved for sale.

How Big Data Makes Research Faster and More Efficient

Of course, the process of clinical research is long and complex. No one wants to put innocent volunteers at risk with under-tested therapy. But this lag has its drawbacks: It can slow down approval of new medical breakthroughs that could help countless people.

Big data and artificial intelligence, however, have the potential to dramatically improve the process. Being able to quickly sift through a large amount of health data and find relevant models has huge implications for the clinical research process.

Not only could this help researchers develop trial-ready therapies faster, but these tools could also help them find the right patients for their studies and place a magnifying glass on the process, allowing them to collect data on the response. patients. The data could even eliminate the need to recruit a control group, create “digital twins”.

The Benefits of Big Data, AI, and Enhanced Data Management for Clinical Research

It’s hard to overstate just how useful big data management could be in improving the clinical research process for a number of reasons. One of the biggest benefits of using data and AI in clinical research is speed, safe speed. Instead of “rushing” a drug to market, data can help spot errors, help researchers make smart, logical decisions, and quickly guide them through the process.

Using data reduces friction and bottlenecks in the process, which are often what hold things up. It is extremely useful for all types of research, but especially during a global health emergency, such as the COVID-19 pandemic.

How data solutions were used during the pandemic

Although the pandemic has devastated communities all over the world, it has ushered in some positive changes in medicine, including clinical trials. Researchers are starting to see new possibilities and to try decentralized trials, which allow volunteers to participate while isolating themselves, thanks to telehealth.

New healthcare data management solutions made these new protocols possible. Being able to track patient data remotely or ask them to voluntarily provide data is a game-changer, especially during a public health crisis. Intelligent data sharing can increase public knowledge of key health facts and improve treatment development for diseases like COVID-19.

Data management: improving the quality of research and healthcare

While data has enormous potential to advance clinical research, organizations don’t always manage their data well. Without proper management and sharing, data cannot be fully exploited and can turn out to be harmful. The data is factual, but there may be errors in collection and management.

That being said, health care quality management can make a huge difference at different levels of the medical industry. For example, some organizations have started using data to show how certain protocols can reduce costs and improve results. Researchers can also use the data to highlight a need for new treatments or protocols.

The bottom line is that in clinical research, data has the potential to provide us with revolutionary advancements faster than ever. With smart management, there is no limit to what these tools can accomplish for medicine and medical research, using the data we already collect.







Managing Health Checks with Egnyte enables companies to automate all compliance regulations that store sensitive employee health information, including COVID vaccination compliance

Truyo, a leader in the truly automated management of consent and data privacy rights, and egnyte, a leader in cloud content governance and security, today announced a new solution –– Health-Check Management –– to enable businesses of all sizes to securely and efficiently collect and retain data. employee COVID-related information in accordance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines. (OSHA) the impending emergency temporary standard and the new interim final rule from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS).

Marketing Technology News: MarTech interview with Henk Campher, CMO at Thinkific

Even with the ongoing debate over the OSHA standard, legal consultants see the need for sufficient preparation. “There is no doubt that at least some form of mandate will be enacted, whether at the state or federal level,” said Michael Hellbusch, partner at Rutan & Tucker, LLP. “As soon as the systems go from voluntary to mandatory, it means that the mandatory use of some type of vaccine accreditation system will be required. Businesses will need to prepare now.

Health-Check Management partnerships are gearing up for impending tenures that will require coronavirus vaccinations or weekly worker testing for organizations with 100 or more employees. Likewise, CMS would impose vaccine requirements on facilities participating in Medicare and Medicaid programs. Health-Check Management, which is powered by Truyo’s privacy platform, in partnership with Egnyte, automates the collection of employee vaccination status and test results and keeps personal health information in the secure environment of ‘Egnyte to facilitate confidentiality.

“It is an incredibly complex time for employers who are now faced with the collection and storage of highly sensitive health information about their employees.” said Dan Clarke, President of Truyo. “The impending tenures worry a lot of employers about how to manage and protect this information, which they did not have to worry about before. It goes far beyond simply collecting vaccine statuses or test results. Employers will now have personal information related to the exemption that could allow an organizational user to make additional deductions about an employee’s health or religious status – and this worries many organizations as it increases exposure to risk of breach notification.

Marketing Technology News: Aura integrates the password manager into a digital all-in-one …

Health-Check Management, co-developed with Intel and powered by Truyo and Egnyte, enables organizations to:

  • Define access levels and restrict access to sensitive medical information
  • Manage the immediate risks associated with potential insider threats
  • Keep sensitive health information in a secure environment
  • Adapt to data retention policies, by mandate
  • Easily produce reports as needed
  • Immovably record data access
  • Mitigate the risk of confidentiality

“This is extremely sensitive information and storing it will become a major challenge for most companies, especially since most are not equipped to collect and store the data. said Jeff Sizemore, governance director at Egnyte. “Most have not had to deal with this type of medically sensitive information in the history of their operations. There is much more to consider beyond just collecting this information from a submission form or email.

The solution is available on a flexible monthly subscription starting at $ 250 / month for up to 500 employees.

Marketing Technology News: VMware recognized for its ESG leadership with an invitation to Dow …

United States: Pennsylvania House demands transparency of population health data

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In an effort to expand public access to health data on the people of Pennsylvania, the Pennsylvania House of Representatives recently passed HB 1893 to amend Section 15 of the Pennsylvania Disease Prevention and Control Act. Pennsylvania. The amendment would bring disease reports, records retained as a result of actions taken as a result of such reports or any other records kept under the said Act to the Right to Know Act. This change would mean that data held by the Department of Health on all infectious diseases reported under the Disease Prevention and Control Act, and not just COVID-19, would be publicly available.

In the continued wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, the public has derived great value from population health data. The number of cases, percent positivity rate, and percent vaccinated are examples of population health data that everyone has followed and, in some way, planned their lives in response to some point in time. since the start of the pandemic.

Proponents of HB 1893 argue that it has become clear that the public and researchers need access to population health data in order to make informed decisions. Pennsylvania lawmakers have indicated the frustration current research studies have faced in trying to obtain baseline data on the health of Pennsylvania’s population on COVID-19. (The Disease Prevention and Control Act, as currently drafted, allows data to be provided to researchers, but this must be done “under strict supervision” by the Department of Health.) Opponents, including Governor Wolf’s administration, fear that HB 1893, in its current form, may allow the public release of personally identifiable medical records because it does not expressly limit the release of information to aggregate data only. In addition, others have expressed concerns about the sharing of this data providing opportunities for hackers as well as other data breaches that could occur if the information were shared publicly.

Although support for HB 1893 is currently divided into partisan lines, this is not the first time that Pennsylvania lawmakers have called for transparency from the Wolf administration and the Department of Health since the start of the COVID pandemic. 19. Law 77 of 2020 required record transparency for all Pennsylvania agencies under the Right to Know Act during a governor-declared disaster. In July 2021, the Pennsylvania Senate passed SB 559 by a unanimous, bipartisan vote of 50-0, which would require the Department of Health to make public this amount of wasted vaccine doses. This bill is now in the House of Representatives.

HB 1893 will rule alongside the Pennsylvania Senate and will likely first be considered by the Senate State Government Committee. Governor Wolf has indicated that, as currently written, he will veto the bill if it comes before him.

In an effort to expand public access to health data on the people of Pennsylvania, the Pennsylvania House of Representatives recently passed HB 1893 to amend Section 15 of the Pennsylvania Disease Prevention and Control Act. Pennsylvania. The amendment would bring disease reports, records retained as a result of actions taken as a result of such reports or any other records kept under the said Act to the Right to Know Act. This change would mean that data held by the Department of Health on all infectious diseases reported under the Disease Prevention and Control Act, and not just COVID-19, would be publicly available.

In the continued wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, the public has derived great value from population health data. The number of cases, percent positivity rate, and percent vaccinated are examples of population health data that everyone has followed and, in some way, planned their lives in response to some point in time. since the start of the pandemic.

Proponents of HB 1893 argue that it has become clear that the public and researchers need access to population health data in order to make informed decisions. Pennsylvania lawmakers have indicated the frustration current research studies have faced in trying to obtain baseline data on the health of Pennsylvania’s population on COVID-19. (The Disease Prevention and Control Act, as currently drafted, allows data to be provided to researchers, but this must be done “under strict supervision” by the Department of Health.) Opponents, including Governor Wolf’s administration, are concerned that HB 1893, in its current form, may allow public disclosure of personally identifiable medical records because it does not expressly limit the disclosure of information to aggregate data only. In addition, others have expressed concerns about the sharing of this data providing opportunities for hackers as well as other data breaches that could occur if the information were shared publicly.

Although support for HB 1893 is currently divided into partisan lines, this is not the first time that Pennsylvania lawmakers have called for transparency from the Wolf administration and the Department of Health since the start of the COVID pandemic. 19. Law 77 of 2020 required record transparency for all Pennsylvania agencies under the Right to Know Act during a governor-declared disaster. In July 2021, the Pennsylvania Senate passed SB 559 by a unanimous, bipartisan vote of 50-0, which would require the Department of Health to make public this amount of wasted vaccine doses. This bill is now in the House of Representatives.

HB 1893 will rule alongside the Pennsylvania Senate and will likely first be considered by the Senate State Government Committee. Governor Wolf has indicated that, as currently written, he will veto the bill if it comes before him.

Originally posted October 19, 2021

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide on the subject. Specialist advice should be sought regarding your particular situation.

POPULAR ARTICLES ON: Food, Medicines, Health Care, Life Sciences of the United States

Food & Beverage Digest – October 2021

Alston & Bird

A California complainant made “guac” claims about a 100% avocado oil product: it actually only contains 10% avocado oil and 90% canola oil.

There are “serious concerns” on the Victorian government’s ‘unprecedented plan’ to establish a centralized health data sharing system that would store information such as prescribed medications and hospitalizations, with no ability for individuals to opt out.

The state government plans to improve information sharing between health services through the creation of a new digital database and the unintentional collection of individual health data, in order to combat the system of patient health information currently fragmented.

But the program has been criticized by figures such as the Australian Privacy Foundation, Liberty Victoria and the Australian Doctors Federation for its lack of required consent, the potential for the database to become a “honeypot” for hackers. computers, and that it could endanger the doctor-patient. confidentiality.

The Victorian May budget included a commitment to reform and consolidate the state’s public pathology services, including improving laboratory information systems. This would include creating a health information exchange that would be hosted and supported by the state health department – a centrally hosted solution in the cloud environment that is “highly available, scalable. and reliable ”.

The Victorian government issued a tender notice for this work seeking a private sector off-the-shelf solution, which closed on December 20.

The legislation behind the new data sharing system has already been passed by the lower house and is expected to be debated in the Legislative Council before the end of the year. The bill formalizes the link between medical and patient health information in a single portal, which can be accessed by authorized users such as physicians or other clinicians.

The information collected in the database will span five years into an individual’s health records.

If passed by the state parliament, the program will come into effect in February 2023 to allow time for the solution to be developed. It will include public hospitals and health services, metropolitan hospitals, ambulance services and forensic mental health units.

Information to be shared in the database and with authorized users includes prescribed medications, allergies, admissions, discharge summaries, and other alerts.

Unlike the very controversial federal program My Health Record, Victorians will have no option to opt out of this medical health sharing program.

The legislation also includes two new criminal offenses to deal with potential unauthorized access to system data and to access it for unauthorized purposes, punishable by up to two years in prison.

“Having complete and accurate health information at the right time and in the right place will save lives and is essential to provide the best patient care,” Labor MP Shaun Leane told Parliament.

“We recognize that a consolidated picture of a patient’s medical and health history is essential to the provision of safe, high-quality care in our public hospitals. In Victoria, essential health information is currently divided between different health services, in separate systems and in paper files. This fragmentation of patient health information often means that clinicians collect patient health information manually, by fax or phone calls.

The state government has argued that the new database will be more secure than the current system using faxes and phone calls.

But the Australian Privacy Foundation has serious concerns about the proposal and has sent a series of questions to the government and the Department of Health. The organization is currently in discussions with senior officials from the Department of Health and Human Services on these issues.

The main concerns are the lack of consent, independent oversight and the risk of this hampering doctor-patient confidentiality, said Australian Privacy Foundation health committee chair Juanita Fernando.

“In view of the proposed exponential expansion of Victorian data collection, consent should be active, in the form of a clear, freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous indication of the individual’s agreement to the collection, holding, management and retention of personal information by health authorities, ”Fernando told InnovationAus.

“The bill erodes the protection of patient-physician confidentiality, and therefore high quality patient care which requires openness of patients, trust and confidence in their clinicians. This can prove disastrous in the context of mental health issues and other conditions related to the social determinants of health.

The Australian Federation of Physicians (ADF) has also raised concerns that the program could damage trust between clinicians and patients.

“ADF maintains that quality healthcare requires patient trust, as well as proper healthcare IT and high integrity data to aid clinical decision making,” the organization said.

“Unfortunately, governments have a very poor track record in implementing reliable systems that deliver quality health information while maintaining the trust of physicians and patients. ADF recommends that the proposal not be implemented until these and other key issues have been publicly debated, carefully considered and resolved.

Liberty Victoria also said she was concerned about the plan’s privacy implications and that there needed to be better public consultation on it.

“This Victorian bill contains no enrollment or opt-out provisions, all patients are enrolled and their consent is not required. There are no provisions for anonymizing people at risk. All data is open to all users of the system, ”said Liberty Victoria.

“Liberty Victoria has serious concerns about the potential of the suggested central database to become a vulnerable ‘honeypot’ for personal data. All patient data, including IDs for each clinic and hospital, should be stored. The database is said to be a major target for exploitation by hackers and organized crime and insufficient emphasis is placed on protecting this personal information. “

The Victorian government issued a declaration that the new law is compatible with human rights, believing that the right to privacy is not limited by powers and that it is normal for individuals not to be able to access or correct their own health information stored on the database.

“Information about a person that is kept in the system may only capture part of their health information, while individual health departments are more likely to have complete and contextual information,” the statement said. compatibility.

“If a person wants to access or change their health information, or has concerns about recording incorrect information, they can access and correct the information through their health service provider. “

But the government did not properly factor the need for confidentiality into that assessment, according to Liberty Victoria.

“The compatibility statement does not demonstrate any balance with the competing need for privacy protection and does not sufficiently address the issue of whether a person consents to their information being stored in a central database,” said the organization.

There is also a risk that having a centralized database of highly sensitive health data acts like a “honeypot” and attracts hackers, Fernando said.

“Aggregate information is, almost by definition, a jar of honeymoon. APIs are needed to access all of this data and many of it are inherently risky, ”she said.

“Health data theft is rampant around the world, and criminals find it very worthwhile to steal or ransom health information. It’s scary, and Australian governments don’t have a good track record here.

More time is needed to consult on the plan and ensure better protections are in place, the foundation argued.

“The range of changes required is manifold and the Victorians should be consulted here. The program should not be abandoned entirely, but should be accountable to the Victorians and be subject to independent oversight, ”said Fernando.

“Certain information should be removed from the collection permitted by the bill, especially when there is no patient consent. The health and well-being of patients, even lives, is at stake here. The bill is neither proportionate nor justified in its present form. Instead, it prompts questions about what it will allow in the future.

Liberty Victoria supported the call for the plan to be given more consideration.

“The speed with which this bill is being introduced into Parliament is of great concern. Such a fundamental long-term policy must be carefully monitored by the parties concerned and by Parliament. Liberty Victoria would be deeply concerned if this bill did not go through the most rigorous scrutiny before being finalized in the Legislative Council, ”he said.

Do you know more? Contact James Riley by email.

PHOENIX & MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif .– (COMMERCIAL THREAD) –Truyo, the leader in the truly automated management of consent and data privacy rights, and egnyte, a leader in cloud content security and governance, today announced a new solution –– Management of health check-ups –– to enable businesses of all sizes to efficiently and securely collect and maintain COVID-related information from employees in accordance with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Temporary Emergency Standard and New Interim Final Rule from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS). .

Even with the ongoing debate over the OSHA standard, legal consultants see the need for sufficient preparation. “There is no doubt that at least some form of mandate will be enacted, whether at the state or federal level,” said Michael Hellbusch, partner at Rutan & Tucker, LLP. “As soon as the systems go from voluntary to mandatory, it means that the mandatory use of some type of vaccine accreditation system will be required. Businesses will need to prepare now.

Health-Check Management partnerships are gearing up for impending tenures that will require coronavirus vaccinations or weekly worker testing for organizations with 100 or more employees. Likewise, CMS would impose vaccine requirements on facilities participating in Medicare and Medicaid programs. Health-Check Management, which is powered by Truyo’s privacy platform, in partnership with Egnyte, automates the collection of employee vaccination status and test results and keeps personal health information in the secure environment of ‘Egnyte to facilitate confidentiality.

“It is an incredibly complex time for employers who are now faced with the collection and storage of highly sensitive health information about their employees.” said Dan Clarke, President of Truyo. “The impending tenures worry many employers about how to manage and protect this information, which they did not have to worry about before. It goes far beyond simply collecting vaccine statuses or test results. Employers will now have personal information related to the exemption that could allow an organizational user to make additional deductions about an employee’s health or religious status – and this worries many organizations as it increases exposure to risk of breach notification.

Health-Check Management, co-developed with Intel and powered by Truyo and Egnyte, enables organizations to:

  • Define access levels and restrict access to sensitive medical information

  • Manage the immediate risks associated with potential insider threats

  • Keep sensitive health information in a secure environment

  • Adapt to data retention policies, by mandate

  • Easily produce reports as needed

  • Immovably record data access

  • Mitigate the risk of confidentiality

“This is extremely sensitive information and storing it will become a major challenge for most companies, especially since most are not equipped to collect and store the data. said Jeff Sizemore, governance director at Egnyte. “Most have not had to deal with this type of medically sensitive information in the history of their operations. There is much more to consider beyond just collecting this information from a submission form or email.

The solution is available on a flexible monthly subscription starting at $ 250 / month for up to 500 employees. To find out more about the Truyo + Egnyte Health-Check Management solution, visit https://bit.ly/health-check-mandate-solution.

Additionally, a webinar series on navigating the intricacies of OSHA and CMS mandates will begin Thursday, November 18 at 8:00 a.m. PST. For more details, visit https://get.truyo.com/osha-cms-mandate-webinar.

About Truyo

Truyo, an IntraEdge company, powered by Intel®, offers customers true consent and automation of data privacy rights management. Specializing in UX privacy, Truyo has a nuanced understanding and in-depth experience of delivering privacy rights management operational, creating better privacy rights and consent management experiences for users and businesses. Through its Truyo privacy platform and health check management solutions, Truyo enables global organizations to manage complex compliance requirements, minimize risk and deliver rapid return on investment. For more information visit truyo.com.

About Egnyte

Egnyte provides the only unified cloud content governance solution for collaboration, data security, compliance and threat prevention for multicloud enterprises. Over 16,000 organizations trust Egnyte to reduce IT risk and complexity, prevent ransomware and IP theft, and increase employee productivity on any application, any cloud, anywhere . Investors include GV (formerly Google Ventures), Kleiner Perkins, Caufield & Byers and Goldman Sachs. For more information visit egnyte.com.

Iqvia, Inc. for follow-up defendants Veeva Systems, Inc. and Peter Stark in the District of New Jersey on Monday for alleged violations of non-competitive agreements the plaintiff had with Stark. The injunction and damages claim cites violation of several agreements, tort interference with contact, non-competition, non-solicitation and confidentiality.

Stark, according to the plaintiffs, previously owned a company called Pursuit Solutions, which was purchased by the plaintiff in 2016. As a result of the transaction and his “continued and highly paid employment with Iqvia,” Stark was subjected to certain no -the obligations of competition, non-solicitation and confidentiality.

Stark’s job at Iqvia would have been to perform marketing analysis, more specifically to lead “the design and future roadmap of Iqvia’s main marketing analysis tool … specifically to compete directly with defendant Veeva”. In 2021, Stark was tasked with collecting trade secrets and other highly confidential information about Iqvia so that they could produce a detailed assessment of their commercial technology offerings against the accused Veeva. He had access to all of Iqvia’s strategic plans, competitive intelligence and investment plans, according to the complaint.

Stark’s valuable position at Iqvia led Veeva to recruit Stark for “employment talks” in June, according to the complaint. The complainant asserts that by recruiting employees of their competitors, Veeva then aims to initiate “unfounded preventive proceedings … seeking to invalidate the non-compete agreements of these employees”. During the months that Stark was engaged in employment discussions with Veeva, he continued to work with highly confidential Iqvia competition information.

In September, Stark informed Iqvia that he would be leaving their company to take a leadership role at Veeva, where he would lead “the development of the overall business services strategy of Veeva.” In an effort to allay Iqvia’s concerns, he informed them that his job with Veeva would not start until January 2022. The complainant says he believes Stark’s employment actually started in October, that he “ is already commercially active with Veeva and guides Veeva in recruiting other Iqvia employees.

Iqvia argues that it now risks losing all of its trade secrets and other confidential information to one of its main competitors due to the illegal actions carried out on behalf of the defendants. They say it is “inconceivable” that Stark will not disclose the confidential information he holds about Iqvia to his new employer, Veeva. The plaintiff claims that anything that is not an immediate injunction will cause irreparable damage to his business.

The plaintiff seeks injunctions preventing Stark and Veeva from continuing any form of employment and violating Stark’s confidentiality agreements with Iqvia. They also seek declaratory and pecuniary reparation, compensatory and punitive damages, pre- and post-judgment interest, litigation costs and any other reparation deemed just by the Court. The applicant is represented by Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman.

Vermont reporters are providing a summary of key takeaways on coronavirus, poverty, and more for Wednesday, November 10.

Want the daily VPR news in podcast form? Get up and running in under 15 minutes with The Frequency every morning of the week. How about an email newsletter? Add our daily email briefing to your morning routine.

While Vermont’s pandemic state of emergency has ended, the delta variant is now circulating in the state. Click here for the latest case news, and find the latest vaccination data online at any time.

1. Data from the Vermont Department of Health shows a slight drop in the number of people hospitalized for COVID-19, increasing the positivity rate

The latest data from the Vermont Department of Health shows that the number of people hospitalized for COVID-19 declined slightly today, even as the state’s positivity rate continues to rise.

About fifty Vermonters are now hospitalized due to the coronavirus, three fewer than yesterday, but still part of the high and sustained levels of hospitalizations in Vermont.

The state’s seven-day positivity rate, high since August due to the delta variant, has been increasing for more than two weeks and is now 3.8%.

In total, the state reported 201 new cases today and one new death from the virus.

– Matthew Smith

COVID cases among school-aged children on the rise

A dramatic spike in COVID cases in Vermont over the past two weeks is disproportionately impacting children aged 5 to 11.

Gov. Phil Scott said in his weekly press briefing yesterday that infection rates among 5 to 11 year olds are now double the rate in the general population.

“Although children in this age group usually have mild illnesses, the case can be upsetting for families, such as not being able to go to school and parents taking time off work as a result,” he said. -he declares.

Scott said the relatively high number of cases in young children should force even more parents to enroll their children for the COVID-19 vaccine.

As of Tuesday morning, about 30% of children aged 5 to 11 had signed up for immunization appointments.

Listen / read the full story.

– Peter Hirschfeld

Recent COVID outbreak shows how virus is spreading among vaccinated people

Health Commissioner Dr Mark Levine said a recent outbreak of COVID at St. Michael’s College Colchester shows just how much of a threat the virus can still pose to those vaccinated.

Recently, 79 students tested positive, although 98% of students are fully immunized.

School officials believe crowded Halloween parties were the main source of infection.

Levine says the incident shows just how contagious the delta variant is.

“I’m afraid that has happened, yes, but am I surprised that it has happened? No,” he said. “From what we’ve seen across the country, this virus can do just that. I don’t know for sure, but I would put money on those cases being very mild. But a case is always a case. , and it’s a shame that happens. “

Levine says he’s happy that more than 95% of students in Vermont are fully immunized.

– Bob Kinzel

2. Rising cost of living causes economic hardship for Vermonters

Advocates say rising costs for housing, transportation and food are making it harder for many Vermonters to make ends meet.

This is despite millions in COVID relief, abundant jobs and rising wages.

Michele Bailey of West Rutland is a single mother of three permanently disabled children, and she says her fixed income is not keeping up.

“We are fortunate to be owners,” she said. “But now my roof is leaking and I can’t afford to fix it. My refrigerator broke the other day and I can’t afford to replace my refrigerator. My car is in its final stages. “

Community groups in Vermont are working to connect those in need with federal COVID relief funds, but say many people are still absent for various reasons.

Read / listen to the full story.

-Nina Keck

3. Authorities plan to help former residents of Sears Lane

City of Burlington officials plan to help former residents of a homeless camp that was closed last month due to reported criminal activity.

MyChamplainValley Reports city ​​officials say they will work with residents of Sears Lane and use federal funding from the US bailout to provide services to homeless people.

The city said it is planning a forum on the issue in January and has asked the state to extend its emergency motel voucher program until 2022. This program provides housing insecure people a temporary motel room.

The city has also created a focus group that includes people affected by homelessness and those who work with the homeless population.

– Associated Press

4. Temperature increases could impact the Vermont ski industry

A new statewide report finds climate change is making Vermont hotter and wetter – faster than regional scientists previously thought.

And that could have big impacts for the $ 1.6 billion Vermont ski industry.

The second Vermont climate assessment released yesterday found that if greenhouse gas emissions are not reduced, Vermont could see temperatures rise by 10 to 16 degrees Fahrenheit by the turn of the century.

In this scenario, the state’s ski industry may not be viable by 2080.

Stephen Posner is director of policy at the Gund Institute, which led the study.

“The ski industry is, I think, one of the groups that I know of that carefully monitors climate data and plans investments accordingly, as well as additional activities in the mountains of ski resorts,” Posner said.

The report found that there is still time to reduce emissions and associated climate impacts.

– Abagael Gilles

5. Federal grant will be used to expand Vermont nursing programs

The Vermont State College system will use a federal grant to expand nursing programs at Northern Vermont University and Vermont Technical College. The money will make room for 60 new students in school nursing programs.

Manpower shortages in Vermont hospitals have gutted nurses.

And Senator Bernie Sanders says the Vermont health care system now spends $ 75 million a year on itinerant nurses to fill the gaps.

“$ 75 million a year to pay nurses who come here, do a good job, but receive significantly higher wages and salaries than local nurses, and that’s fundamentally insane and dysfunctional,” he said. he declares.

Sanders, who helped secure a $ 240,000 grant for the Vermont State College system, says Vermont will need about 9,000 new nurses to join the Vermont workforce over the next seven years. .

And he says expanding nursing programs at Vermont state colleges will increase the local supply of qualified health professionals.

– Peter Hirschfeld

6. Vermont Doctors Provide Sneak Peek Of COVID Vaccine For Children

As thousands of Vermont families grapple with whether to vaccinate their young children for COVID, doctors across the state are looking to address concerns.

The American Academy of Pediatrics is organize a series of presentations to answer questions about the COVID vaccine for children ages 5 to 11.

In the first discussion this week, Dr Leah Costello, a pediatrician from South Burlington, looked at clinical trial data on thousands of children. She pointed out that the shot is over 90% effective in preventing COVID infections in young children.

And most of the children in the clinical trial had no side effects. About a third reported mild fatigue or headaches after receiving the injection – about the same as a group of children given a placebo.

Costello said a common concern she was hearing is about a heart problem called myocarditis. It is inflammation of the heart muscle, which can lead to chest pain and shortness of breath. This is a rare side effect of the vaccine, seen in about one in 10,000 young men after puberty.

But it’s also a symptom of COVID, where the condition is more common and more severe.

“The vaccine is much more likely to prevent myocarditis than to cause it,” Costello explained. “Because the vaccine prevents COVID, and COVID can cause myocarditis. “

Costello stressed that it’s okay to want more information and not be the first to get the shot.

“It’s good to have questions and to feel some hesitation,” she said. “There has been a lot of decision fatigue over the past 20 months, and that’s just another decision.”

She shared that her two young children were vaccinated after her approval last week.

– Lexi Krupp

Marlon Hyde compiled and edited this article.

Do you have questions, comments or advice? Send us a message or tweet us @vprnet.

Truveta, a startup that aggregates and analyzes patient data for drug research and development, launched its platform on Tuesday with $ 200 million in funding and new research into groundbreaking COVID-19 infections.

Founded earlier this year, the company is backed by 20 healthcare systems, including big names like Tenet Health, Providence and CommonSpirit Health, accounting for more than 16% of patient care in the United States.

The Seattle-based startup collects and sells data from its vendor groups, with the information standardized and anonymized to protect patient privacy and safety.

The startup had already landed $ 95 million in its Series A funding round in July. When it launched on Tuesday, the company said its total funding was $ 200 million.

Truveta uses machine learning to structure clinical data into an FHIR model for faster insight, and the platform is updated daily with new data.

RELATED: Tenet, Providence, and Other Health Giants Join Forces to Form New Health Data Startup

The company has also released information from COVID-19 data collected from partner health systems. Due to the siled nature of clinical data in the United States, many decisions made to manage the COVID-19 pandemic have relied on data from other countries that may not reflect the diverse population of the country, a said Terry Myerson, CEO of Truveta and former Microsoft executive.

“With the moral imperative to fill this important gap, Truveta was born out of innovative health systems that came together to provide an unprecedented national data set for health in the United States,” he said in a communicated. declaration. “Now, Truveta is sharing the first COVID-19 information in the United States using real-time data, which is a big step forward in realizing our vision of saving lives through data. “

An analysis of 1.7 million fully vaccinated patients on Truveta’s platform showed that vaccinated people with diabetes, chronic lung disease or chronic kidney disease or who are immunocompromised are almost twice as likely to be hospitalized with major COVID-19 infections than the general vaccinated population.

The startup also found that 9% of patients vaccinated with Pfizer and 15% of patients vaccinated with Johnson & Johnson who have breakthrough COVID-19 infections are hospitalized.

RELATED: Health Systems Backed Truveta Secures Microsoft Investment and Cloud Partnership

However, adverse events occur in less than 1% of fully vaccinated patients, according to the results, meaning that the risk of serious illness from COVID-19 in a vaccinated person is well below 1%.

“In just under two weeks, our team was able to ask and answer important medical questions using one of the largest comprehensive real-time data sets of fully vaccinated Americans,” said Nick Stucky, MD, Ph.D., director of clinical research at Truveta and an infectious disease physician at Providence Portland Medical Center. “I am energized by the opportunity that the Truveta platform can offer physicians like me and clinical researchers around the world to discover solutions to health problems at new levels of speed and precision. We invite other researchers to join us in exploring and deepening this knowledge. “

Truveta plans to continue expanding its platform in the coming months. The startup announced a partnership with Microsoft in September to use its Azure cloud for Truveta’s clinical data platform.

Microsoft has also invested an undisclosed amount in the startup.

The tech giant, along with other big tech players like Google and Amazon Web Services, has continued its push into healthcare with this partnership and other strategic initiatives to deliver cloud computing technology and data storage to hospitals and health systems.

Students will explore how where we live can affect our health

New learning materials are coming for high school science students in Washington State! The material combines data, news articles and even poetry in all new learning modules. These new modules will allow students to see how climate change and geographic locations can impact their health.

What are the different impacts of climate change on pregnant women and their babies?

Are the impacts evenly distributed across our state?

Why are black women more at risk of climate change pregnancy complications than white women?

What actions at community and state level can reduce the harm to women and their babies?

These are just a few questions that students will consider in “Climate Change and Pregnancy”. This is one of four new science modules designed to show students the impact of science on our lives and communities by examining real local data. The new materials were made possible through a unique partnership. The people of our Washington Tracking Network (WTN) has partnered with Puget Sound Education Services District (PSESD) to develop these exciting new materials.

WTN’s mission is to make public health data more accessible to everyone, and this project brings The data directly in the classroom. The project is the first of its kind in the country!

“We are working hard to engage students in real-world data,” said Cheryl Lydon, director of the science program at PSDES. “These modules will give teachers a powerful tool to link climate change to hyper-local public health issues of interest to their students.”

Using data, news and poetry to explore health and climate

Modules show students how to analyze health and climate data and teach how to use WTN tools to find information on their own. Modules also include resources that are not typically part of science lessons: newspaper articles, poetry, and community engagement.

This diversity of approaches links the study of science and society to health and the environment. As WTN Director Jennifer Sabel says: “In our society, there is so much emphasis on our individual choices. There needs to be more emphasis on how where we live also contributes to our health. “

A local perspective

The modules are designed to increase data literacy. They show students how to find data, use real tools, and analyze the real impacts of the information they are examining. They also provide an overview of the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) career of epidemiology. Epidemiology is the study of when and where disease and other health problems occur, with the goal of improving health. Students will work with the same health data that WTN epidemiologists use – and even hear some talk about their work.

We’re excited to see how the new learning material will engage science students in classrooms across the state. These documents are available free of charge to everyone via the Open educational resource communities.

Bryan Cush, the co-founder of Tidal Health Group, a healthcare marketing company, stopped by my office to discuss SEO and healthcare marketing. Bryan is quite technical and is able to bridge that with his deep understanding of medicine and health, marketing and site development – I think that’s a beautiful thing. They mainly work on patient acquisition and empowerment of their clients. We dug a bit into that and how he works with his clients.

Challenges in using health data for content:

We briefly touched on the delicate aspects of using your internal health data and customer health data for content marketing purposes. Bryan explained that he shares an office with a lawyer and has tons of reassurance due to the sensitivity of this data. He shared a few stories of how he used some of his customer’s data to map keyword data around technical terms versus what consumers are typing to search for that technical term. It is therefore essential to map your data for marketing purposes. This may be more important in the health field than in other sectors.

Did you know Google used MUM for a similar purpose, to identify and map around 800 different variations of COVID vaccine names. Bryan said they don’t necessarily use AI or machine learning for this, but rather a simple structured taxonomy where you map data over time. He said you can use this method over and over again no matter who the customer is.

You can read more about Bryan Cush at Tidal Health Group.

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